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COVID-19 blog, 4 October: thirty new positive test results have been added in the past 24 hours

The last 24 hours have seen a total of 1,238 initial tests being analysed in Estonia in relation to the SARS-CoV-2 virus which causes COVID-19, with thirty new positive test results being added.

Based on the data in the population register, the highest number of new positive test results came from Ida-Viru County, where thirteen further individuals were found to have been infected. Eleven new positive coronavirus test results were added from Harju County and two cases from Tartu County. A single further new coronavirus case each was also added from Jõgeva County, Võru County, and Rapla County. On one occasion, the place of residence of the individual who tested positive was not specified in the population register. As a rule, such individuals tend to be foreign nationals.

The number of cases for every 100,000 people in the last fourteen days is 51.62.

Two of the eleven new cases from Harju County (of whom eight were from Tallinn) were infected within the family circle. The circumstances surrounding the remaining cases are still being investigated.

There are seven different outbreaks in total within the northern regional department’s area of operations, of which the largest is the East Tallinn Central Hospital outbreak which involves twenty-five employees, fourteen patients, and two cafeteria employees who have fallen ill. Twenty-nine pupils and ten teachers have been infected in connection with the Läänemere Gymnasium outbreak. Twenty-nine cases are connected to the first workplace outbreak, while the Haapsalu Nostalgia Days outbreak involves eight cases, the Rescue Board outbreak seven cases, and another workplace outbreak seven cases, with a further five individuals also being connected to an outbreak within a circle of family members and acquaintances.

The inspectors of the Health Board’s northern regional department are monitoring more than 2,200 people, of whom 372 have fallen ill.

Four of the new cases from Ida-Viru County caught the virus within the family circle and five further cases did so in the workplace. Four of the cases which revolve around infection in the workplace involve working at a school, and a further one case involves working in a care home. On three occasions, the individuals concerned were infected via their acquaintances. The circumstances surrounding the remaining one case are being investigated.

Two new outbreaks were added from Ida-Viru County, these being the Sillamäe Old Town School outbreak which involves six individuals, and an outbreak at an entertainment establishment which involves nine cases in total in Kohtla-Järve and Sillamäe. The largest outbreak in the region, one within a circle of acquaintances, involves thirty cases, while the Kohtla-Järve workplace outbreak involves seven cases, the first Sillamäe workplace outbreak fourteen cases, and the second Sillamäe workplace outbreak nine cases. A further eleven cases are connected to the Tammiku Basic School outbreak, seven cases to the Kohtla-Järve Central Elementary School outbreak, seven cases to another outbreak within a circle of family members and acquaintances in Ida-Viru County, and five cases to the Kohtla-Järve birthday party outbreak. There are also seven cases that are connected to the Jõhvi Gymnasium outbreak and six cases to the Jõhvi Care Home outbreak, with the latter involving one care home employee and five of its clients.

The Health Board’s eastern regional department is monitoring over 1,000 people, of whom 192 have fallen ill.

The new case from Jõgeva County was infected by a family member, while the new case from Tartu County was due to close contact with an individual who had already fallen ill. The circumstances surrounding the other cases which were added today from the southern regional department are still being investigated.

The southern regional department is monitoring over 360 people in connection with coronavirus, of whom sixty-five have fallen ill. One active outbreak is being monitored in the region, in a workplace in Võru which involves twenty-three individuals.

Forty-one patients are being treated in hospital, with three on a ventilator

As of the morning of 4 October, a total of forty-one people in Estonia are being treated in hospital due to coronavirus, with three patients on a ventilator. No new patients were discharged from hospital and seven new COVID-19 cases were opened. One patient was transferred from the Ida-Viru Central Hospital to another hospital.

No new deaths have been added in the past 24 hours. Coronavirus has now claimed the lives of sixty-seven people in Estonia.

As of today, 3 October, hospitals have closed a total of 473 cases relating to COVID-19 which involved 460 people.

Also as of 4 October, a total of 2,749 people have recovered from COVID-19. The cases of 2,090 people have been closed (76% of the total) and, in the case of 659 people (24%), more than 28 days have passed since they tested positive and the individuals concerned are not being treated in hospital, meaning that they are awaiting confirmation of their recovery.

Eighteen testing sites in Estonia are collecting nasopharyngeal samples based on referrals. Three of these testing sites are located at the port and in the airport and are designed to test people who arrive in Estonia from abroad.

Over 220,000 initial tests have been analysed in Estonia, of which 3,577 or 1.6% of the total have been positive for the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Detailed statistical data from the coronavirus tests is available at: www.koroonakaart.ee/en.

The Health Board would like to caution everyone: the situation is becoming increasingly serious

The following weeks will be critical for getting the virus under control. Wearing a mask in Estonia is not compulsory, but doing so is a very good additional measure in connection with maintaining the required distance from others, along with proper hand hygiene, and proper respiratory hygiene. Anyone who has developed any symptoms must wear a mask in public places or if direct contact is unavoidable. All close contacts of an individual who has been diagnosed with coronavirus should wear a mask even if they do not yet have any symptoms. It is very important to place, wear, and remove the mask properly in order to avoid being infected. Always sanitise your hands after removing your mask.

It is important that we use all possible measures to help us prevent any further spread of the virus. COVID-19 is about to reach vital services and risk groups such as hospitals and care homes. Taking into consideration the increasing spread of the virus worldwide as well as in Europe, all trips abroad should be cancelled, and the school holidays should be spent in Estonia. It is up to all of us to make sure that we can avoid the imposition of stricter restrictions so that we can continue to lead our lives normally. 

As ‘close contact’ refers to a situation in which individuals remain within two metres of one another for a period of at least fifteen minutes, attending a gathering when you are ill is a certain way of infecting your friends. At gatherings people often spend several hours together in an enclosed space, speaking loudly at each other. The latter act certainly facilitates the spread of the particles that can transmit the virus.

Anyone who attends a public event and who has a smartphone should install the HOIA coronavirus app which more efficiently helps to identify potential close contacts.

How can the spread of coronavirus be stopped?

  • The most efficient measure which can be applied to avoid being infected is keeping one’s distance.
  • In crowded places and especially indoors where it is not possible to maintain the required distance from other people, it is advisable to wear a mask.
  • Closed, crowded spaces should be avoided if possible.
  • The rules governing hand hygiene must be observed: hands must be washed frequently.
  • Hands should be washed in soap and warm water. Alcohol-based hand sanitation products should be used in public places.
  • When you sneeze or cough, please cover your mouth and nose with a disposable tissue. Immediately safely dispose of the used tissue and clean your hands. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve (or part of your forearm), not your bare hand, to cover your mouth and nose.
  • Anyone who becomes ill should stay at home, even if their symptoms are mild.
  • People who develop any symptoms should suspect that they have coronavirus and contact their family physician.
  • Download the HOIA mobile app from Google Play or App Store which will inform you if you have come into close contact with an individual who has coronavirus. The app also allows you to anonymously notify other users if you have fallen ill yourself. Codes are being exchanged anonymously between the phones of people who use the app, while the government, the app’s developer, and the manufacturer of your phone will not be notified of those with whom you have come into close contact. Further information is available here: www.hoia.me/en.

COVID-19 is a droplet infection which is caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus spreading from one person to another as a result of sneezing and coughing or via contaminated surfaces and unwashed hands.

According to information from the Health and Welfare Information Systems Centre, as of today the HOIA app has been downloaded on 149,060 occasions, and seventy-three individuals have used the app to highlight themselves as having been infected.

Further information about COVID-19 can be found on the Health Board website and on its Facebook page.

Which numbers may be used by the Health Board’s automated calling system to contact you?

One of the options available when it comes to verifying the authenticity of the call is to check the caller’s number. The automated system uses the following numbers:

  • +372 601 1104
  • +372 601 1041
  • +372 601 1365
  • +372 601 1143
  • +372 601 1355

In addition to an initial call which is made to notify people that they have come into close contact with an infected individual, the automated system also makes further check-up calls to investigate whether or not any individual who has already received an initial warning has developed any symptoms of coronavirus. If the individual does not feel well, they are asked to immediately contact their family physician.

The automated system was created to relieve the burden on the Health Board’s employees, as the number of close contacts has increased explosively in the recent period. The Health Board’s inspectors are also still personally contacting individuals who have fallen ill.

Veel uudiseid samal teemal

28.07.2021

COVID-19 blog, 28 July: 173 new positive test results have been added within the past 24 hours

The last 24 hours have seen 3,172 tests being analysed in Estonia in relation to coronavirus, of which the results of 173 (5.5%) of the initial tests were positive. A full 6,142 vaccine doses were also administered within the past 24 hours. In total, 627,375 individuals have been vaccinated against COVID-19 in Estonia, and 552,952 individuals have now received both doses. A total of 56.5% of the entire adult population has received at least one vaccine dose.

28.07.2021

COVID-19 blog, 28 July: 173 new positive test results have been added within the past 24 hours

The last 24 hours have seen 3,172 tests being analysed in Estonia in relation to coronavirus, of which the results of 173 (5.5%) of the initial tests were positive. A full 6,142 vaccine doses were also administered within the past 24 hours. In total, 627,375 individuals have been vaccinated against COVID-19 in Estonia, and 552,952 individuals have now received both doses. A total of 56.5% of the entire adult population has received at least one vaccine dose.